4 top tips on melodic minor fingering

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By Ellie Palmer

19 March 2019

We offer up 4 crucial pieces of advice for those tricky little melodic minors.

Melodic minors are tricky, confusing and - for many of us - a necessity. And yet it beggars belief that there is such a lack of guidance on melodic minor scales online. You may be able to find explanations of what melodic minors are, but you’ll struggle to find any variety of exercises and tips. 


Pianists like yourself need guidance on ALL aspects of playing, which is why we’ve created a whole bunch of melodic minor content for you. We’ve put together a cheat sheet full of melodic minor exercises, professional advice and progress trackers. 

 

All About Melodic Minors - Pianist

Our latest cheat sheet includes everything you need to know about melodic minors, key terminology to remember, top tips on melodic minor fingering, and two jam-packed interactive pages full of melodic minor exercises. Like with our All About Arpeggios cheat sheet, you can also track your progress as you go along!

Find out more

 

 

 

Not only that, but we’ve also gathered 4 top tips on melodic minor fingering to help you on your way!

 

1. The benefits of beginning on the fourth

Try starting with your fourth finger in the left hand. You’ll notice that this works well when used in the E, B, G and F# melodic minor scales. Starting on the fourth will give you more flexibility when rotating your hand as you move up the scale. Why? Starting on the fifth finger, as many scales do, can lead to awkward positioning for your hands, especially with these four scales. 
Like with any scale, try out both and see which one works for you.

 

2. Utilise the second

For scales starting on a black note and followed immediately by a white note (Bb and Eb), begin both the left hand and right hand with the second finger. Naturally, your thumb will follow before swinging your hand over the top to continue with the scale. 
The great thing about this tip is that it not only applies to melodic minors but also to the harmonic minor and major scales. It’s a win-win!

 

3. Adjust quickly

Take extra care when approaching the top of the ascending scale. The sequence of notes in the descending scale are different, therefore you will have to make quick adjustments to your fingering on the way back down. Here are 3 quick tips on adjusting quickly:

4. Find what suits you best

Try out a few different combinations before settling on the sequence most suitable for you. After all, we all play in different styles meaning that some fingering patterns will be more comfortable than others. Once you’ve found a pattern that works for you, stick to it. 

 


Looking for some advice on the rest of your piano scales? Take a look at our 5 professional tips on how to nail your scales. 

5 professional tips on how to nail your scales

5 professional tips for executing your scales to perfection These 5 professional tips will apply to every single level of pianist, and every single type of scale. Scales are a very undervalued exercise. For some of us, it can be a chore; an exercise you just have to do in order to pass your exam.

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